A response to white liberals defending Colbert’s “ching chong” remarks

Written by a good friend of mine, republished with her permission.

I don’t know how to explain that satirizing racism by using racism towards a marginalized group is not edgy or revolutionary or anti-racist. I don’t know how to accurately convey the hurt and fear and frustration your comment engenders. I don’t know how to explain why basic survival often feels like an impossibility.

If I do know anything, it is that this is my lived reality:

Sit down. Shut up. Be respectful. This country greeted you with open arms, don’t you know? You are an American. Kids follow you around singing, “Ching-chong, ding-dong.” Kids laugh as they pull at the corner of their eyes. Deal with it. You are not American enough.

Hate your parents for their accent, this undeniable evidence of their foreignness. Live in terror of them speaking in public. Hate the color of your yellow skin. Hate the shape of your almond eyes. Pray to whatever God you believe in (and the ones you don’t) to make you white. Pay whatever companies promise to Americanize you. Your parents ask why you have forgotten your culture. Ignore them. You will be American enough.

Grow up. Become the model minority society says you are. Quash down the suspicion that your classmates are only nice because you share your notes. At age 12: “Asian women are so hot.” At age 14: “You’re Asian, so you must be good in bed.” Society says you are still too young for sex, but don’t you dare question why these men never got the message.

Go to college. Meet liberals who throw around the words “solidarity” and “allyship”. Learn that men, especially gay white men, know all about oppression. Trust that these people are on your side. Realize with horror that “I hate colored people” is acceptable when framed as a joke. Realize with horror that you traded one toxic environment for another. Find your voice, your strength. Speak up. See how the white liberals cower when you say the word “race”. Do not mistake this for power.

White moderates believe in fighting racism with racism, no matter how much it hurts you. Haven’t you tried talking to your oppressors? Your oppressors are your friends. Your feelings do not matter. Recognize that telling this story promises pain (you asked for it, you bitch). Recognize that not telling this story means girls who look like you will follow in your footsteps. Do not laugh at the irony.

Sit down. Shut up. Be respectful. This country greeted you with gritted teeth and the chink, chink, chink of cheap railroad labor. Your lived reality was only ever a thought experiment. Your lived reality was only ever a punch line.

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Being an LGBT individual is not always a radical act or an act of resistance that brings critique to the prevailing heteronormative order and the differences among these individuals need to be taken into account. As Jasbir Puar avers in Terrorist Assemblages some queer subjects/LGBT people are complicit in existing hetoronormative power structures. Puar, building onto the concept of ‘homonormativity’, argues that during the US war on terror the rising tolerance to queer people in the country has hailed some queers into a homonormative form of nationalism. This does not mean that the heteronormative order of the society has been disrupted or that all queer individuals enjoy equal rights. While these homonormative queer bodies signify the difference between the oriental other of the West, they are also used to mark the terrorist as queer.

Nation-states discipline and use sexual identities in line with their national ideologies. The USA which portrays itself as an exceptional and superior state legitimizes its imperial policies as the protector of civil rights and even democracy around the world by tokenizing LGBT rights. Thus the redemptive discourse to save the women of the orient from their own patriarchal cultures is extended to include queers in other parts of the world. It would not be mistaken to claim that identities based on same-sex sexual desire are utilised to signify the differences between the West and ‘the other’ and to draw the borders of a nation state of the USA to realize its imperial ambitions.
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thepeoplesrecord:

Rest in power Dedé Mirabal (3/1/1925 - 2/1/2014)
Dedé was the last living member of the MIrabal sisters. Four sisters, Patria, Minerva, Maria Teresa and Dede Mirabal had the courage to stand up to Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo, who ruled the country from 1930 to 1938 and from 1942 to 1952. They distributed pamphlets about Trujillo’s numerous victims and engaged in other activities against the oppressive regime.
The sisters were arrested and imprisoned frequently, but they refused to back down. Finally on Nov. 25, 1960, Patria, 36, Minerva, 34, and Maria Teresa, 25, along with their driver, were clubbed to death by Trujillo’s men. Trujillo himself was assassinated just six months later.
The Mirabal sisters became international heroines for their work for democracy. That’s why so many locals were saddened Saturday when they learned the last surviving Mirabal sister, Dede — Bélgica Adela Mirabal-Reyes — died just a month short of her 89th birthday.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Rest in power Dedé Mirabal (3/1/1925 - 2/1/2014)

Dedé was the last living member of the MIrabal sisters. Four sisters, Patria, Minerva, Maria Teresa and Dede Mirabal had the courage to stand up to Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo, who ruled the country from 1930 to 1938 and from 1942 to 1952. They distributed pamphlets about Trujillo’s numerous victims and engaged in other activities against the oppressive regime.

The sisters were arrested and imprisoned frequently, but they refused to back down. Finally on Nov. 25, 1960, Patria, 36, Minerva, 34, and Maria Teresa, 25, along with their driver, were clubbed to death by Trujillo’s men. Trujillo himself was assassinated just six months later.

The Mirabal sisters became international heroines for their work for democracy. That’s why so many locals were saddened Saturday when they learned the last surviving Mirabal sister, Dede — Bélgica Adela Mirabal-Reyes — died just a month short of her 89th birthday.

Source

Where are your manners? Have you been so entitled to acting like a brat and throwing your tantrums when something doesn’t go your way that you’ve forgotten about them? Were you never disciplined as a child, leading you to believe were free to do whatever you pleased? I sincerely believe the political right wing in modern U.S. politics is a manifestation of white male entitlement syndrome. Newsflash: you’re not entitled to anything, and “entitlement spending” is just a right-wing talking point deployed to refer to federal spending that boosts the economic and social welfare of our society.

The true entitlement lies within you.

[read more]

lallowethyu
lisaquestions:

So this is Piers Morgan’s response to Janet Mock’s critical reaction to the way he framed his interview with her. Several other tweets are at the end of this buzzfeed article about Janet Mock.
So what we have here is a cisgender white man showing his true colors when a trans woman of color (actually two trans women of color, since Laverne Cox was with Janet when the interview aired) objects to the way the interview was framed, by saying Janet “used to be a man” and that she “was a boy until she turned 18,” and obsessing over her relationships and disclosures to the men she’s dated and her anatomy and when she’s had surgery and not talking about the trans women of color’s lived realities. 
So tomorrow night (or rather, later tonight since it’s after midnight for me) we’ll get to see a cisgender white man with a rather far reaching media platform have a go at a black trans woman because she didn’t show the proper amount of deference and gratitude about the way the interview was framed.
Toni D’orsay has a better post on this, but that tweet above has been pissing me off since I saw it. The sheer arrogance of this man. It’s not about him being treated in a “disgraceful manner.” It’s about who dared to challenge him.

lisaquestions:

So this is Piers Morgan’s response to Janet Mock’s critical reaction to the way he framed his interview with her. Several other tweets are at the end of this buzzfeed article about Janet Mock.

So what we have here is a cisgender white man showing his true colors when a trans woman of color (actually two trans women of color, since Laverne Cox was with Janet when the interview aired) objects to the way the interview was framed, by saying Janet “used to be a man” and that she “was a boy until she turned 18,” and obsessing over her relationships and disclosures to the men she’s dated and her anatomy and when she’s had surgery and not talking about the trans women of color’s lived realities. 

So tomorrow night (or rather, later tonight since it’s after midnight for me) we’ll get to see a cisgender white man with a rather far reaching media platform have a go at a black trans woman because she didn’t show the proper amount of deference and gratitude about the way the interview was framed.

Toni D’orsay has a better post on this, but that tweet above has been pissing me off since I saw it. The sheer arrogance of this man. It’s not about him being treated in a “disgraceful manner.” It’s about who dared to challenge him.

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humanrightswatch:

Native women deserve a national inquiry on violence

“They tore my sweater and jeans off in the holding cell. There were three or four of them – men – a female guard was watching,” Joy I. told me. “I tried to sit up and they pepper sprayed me twice. They kept pushing me down and tearing my clothes off.”
Joy (a pseudonym) was recounting her experience when the RCMP arrested her in 2011 after breaking up a fight in which she was being beaten up. It was the summer of 2012, and my colleagues and I were conducting research for a Human Rights Watch investigation into police mistreatment of native women and girls in northern British Columbia. Joy hesitated to talk but ultimately came forward to offer her recollection of her encounter with the police. The police, she said, took her clothes and left her in the cell in her underwear for the rest of the night. The next morning the police released her without charges – and, she said, without allowing her to put her pants back on. “I had to walk back to my brother’s like that – no pants; clothes in bag.”
Read more.
Photo: Highway 16, sometimes referred to as “the Highway of Tears” in recognition of the women and girls who have gone missing or been murdered in its vicinity, in northern British Columbia. July 2012. © Samer Muscati/Human Rights Watch

humanrightswatch:

“They tore my sweater and jeans off in the holding cell. There were three or four of them – men – a female guard was watching,” Joy I. told me. “I tried to sit up and they pepper sprayed me twice. They kept pushing me down and tearing my clothes off.”

Joy (a pseudonym) was recounting her experience when the RCMP arrested her in 2011 after breaking up a fight in which she was being beaten up. It was the summer of 2012, and my colleagues and I were conducting research for a Human Rights Watch investigation into police mistreatment of native women and girls in northern British Columbia. Joy hesitated to talk but ultimately came forward to offer her recollection of her encounter with the police. The police, she said, took her clothes and left her in the cell in her underwear for the rest of the night. The next morning the police released her without charges – and, she said, without allowing her to put her pants back on. “I had to walk back to my brother’s like that – no pants; clothes in bag.”

Read more.

Photo: Highway 16, sometimes referred to as “the Highway of Tears” in recognition of the women and girls who have gone missing or been murdered in its vicinity, in northern British Columbia. July 2012. © Samer Muscati/Human Rights Watch